Green Wall

As of today we now have a green wall for students to use for video projects!  It can be found in the hallway on the way up to the Tech Office and the paint hardly had time to dry before our students started using the wall for projects this morning.  This should be a great addition for Upper School students, but anyone at Pike should feel welcome to use it.

A green screen can be a great way for students (and teachers) to be creative with digital media.  If you are looking for ideas, the following article has a lot of good information about How to Integrate a Green Screen Wall into any classroom.  Please be in touch with the Tech Dept. if you would like help trying any of these ideas.

Special Thanks to Maintenance who literally 
turned this wall     —–>    to this overnight!

  

Thank you so much to Rick, Mark, Watson and Will for making this happen!!!

Periodic Table of VR and AR Apps

The New Periodic Table Of iPad Apps for Augmented and Virtual Reality was created by Mark Anderson @ICTEvangelist and curated by Steve Bambury @VIRTUALITEACH 

There is a new periodic table of apps devoted entirely to augmented and virtual reality iOS apps that can be used in the classroom.  Click here to read the entire post about this amazing new tool created by Mark Anderson and Steve Bambury. The periodic table is broken down into 8 categories (STEM, Creativity, Geography, Story Telling, Art, Teaching, Science and History) so you can look at it by color according to the subject you are interested in. There is also an interactive version of the Periodic Table of VR and AR apps on Thinglink so you that can easily located all the apps mentioned on the chart.

So far, I had fun exploring the Renwick Gallery Wonder 360 app in the Art category and was able to virtually travel to Washington, DC and experience some contemporary large scale installations made with unexpected materials from the comfort of my chair at Pike.


If you are looking for new tools that could help you integrate AR or VR into your classroom this could be what you were looking for to spark some ideas and get you started. If you need further help please be in touch with the Tech Department.

Revisiting Google Arts & Culture

We introduced Google Arts & Culture last winter, but there have been many updates since it was first released so it seemed like a good time to revisit this awesome free resource.

First off, you may have heard of the Google Arts & Culture feature that lets you match your face to a famous painting that went viral over last weekend.  If you would like to join in on the fun, download the app if you haven’t already and scroll down until you see the Is your portrait in a museum? function and take and submit your photo (I did a screenshot to grab my image when complete by pressing and holding the off and the home buttons at the same time).


Beyond this fun activity you can still virtually explore many museums from several countries around the world via a browser or with their free iPad app.  The zoom views and virtual tours allow you to experience many of the world’s greatest treasures and landmarks and they are constantly adding to the collection.  This timely new addition helps users celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day by exploring a dynamic historical collection of his sermons, speeches and correspondences.

Google Arts and Culture is the perfect thing to try if you are looking to amplify one of your lessons with a real view related to your curriculum.  If you would like help giving this a try with your class please contact the tech department.

Digital Citizenship Week

This week is Digital Citizenship week!  To kick off our Tech Communications for the year, we are sharing resources that we hope you will find useful for your Digital Citizenship work in the classroom this year.  We request that a message go home after you cover any digital citizenship lessons to help families continue the conversation and reinforce topics at home.  Please reach out to the Tech Department if you need assistance with a message to parents or if you need help implementing anything this year.  

For Grades 1 – 5 BrainPop has free access to their Digital Citizenship Collection.  Their learning pathways tackle topics like Information Privacy, Media Literacy, and Digital Etiquette and students do activities where they can apply what they have learned and teachers can easily access understanding.  There is also an extensive list of Teacher Digital Citizenship Resources available.  

For Grades 3 – 5 Be Internet Awesome by Google helps kids become safe, confident explorers of the online world.  Their curriculum gives educators the tools and methods they need to teach digital safety fundamentals in the classroom and students apply their learning via Interland, a playful browser-based game that makes this topic interactive and fun.  Click here to access Teacher Training for this curriculum.

For Grades 6 – 9 the Applied Digital Skills by Google is a well developed free computer literacy course designed to prepare students for a growing number of jobs that require basic digital skills. With their Applied Digital Skills Curriculum learners explore units and apply skills in real world activities that practice topics like planning an event, creating an interactive guide and many more.  

For Grades 3 – 9, This Digital citizenship and social emotional learning article outlines how character strengths can be used in a positive way to navigate digital dilemmas.  Their Digital Citizenship & Social and Emotional Learning Teacher Guide contains a set of scenarios that students may face at some point in their lives and encourages conversation about character with the goal of developing strengths like humility and perseverance.  

Common Sense Media Ed Tech Reviews –  Their EdTech reviews and supporting resources can help you bring tech tools to your classroom via a collection of age appropriate resources curated by knowledgeable educators.  

Common Sense Media Digital Citizenship Week Resources is a page developed for this week that you can explore, which has many useful resources that can help your students be, as they say, Dig-Cit Ready.  

How to listen to Podcasts


Have you been wanting to start listening to the latest cool podcasts, but don’t know where to start?  Watch the above video or 
click here to see a brief introduction (under 2 minutes!) on how to listen to podcasts.  This can be a great time saving way to squeeze in some learning while you are driving, exercising or whenever.  For more detailed information about the Podcasts app that I speak about in the video this apple support page has all the info that you would need.  If you have questions or need help after watching this very short video please contact the Tech Department.  

Seesaw and Google Drive Integration

Seesaw has added integration with Google Drive. You can now add Google Drive Docs, Spreadsheets, Slides, videos, and pictures directly to Seesaw. This allows you to create documents in Google drive with text, drawings, and pictures and then insert them into your Seesaw feed. Write a monthy letter to parents and share it with them in Seesaw.  Add multiple pictures to a document and then share the doc via Seesaw. Find out the details here.

 

 

TED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing

This post that lists 9 TED Talks recommended by students, for students caught our attention.  It includes a range of TED Talks about topics like education, character development, leadership, public speaking and what adults can learn from children that students have given the seal of approval.  It was published by a new resource called TED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing.  Their Lesson Library is a growing list of many lively lessons created by educators in collaboration with professional animators that can be a nice supplemental resource to amplify your teaching.  See some of the existing topics and examples below:

With a free account you can also create your own lessons or flip an existing lesson to adjust any previously created content to fit your needs and share with your students, with interactive reflection options and a way to plug any YouTube video into a lesson separate from all of the distractions of YouTube.  If you need help or if you give TED-Ed: Lessons Worth Sharing a try let us know.

Capture, organize, and share student thinking with Post-it Note Plus

Some teachers have students use post it notes to handwrite feedback about topics or as an exit ticket after class.  Do you use post it notes in your class or have you wanted to try something like this?  If so, the Post it Note Plus App will be a great addition to your technology toolbox.  Post it Note Plus allows you to scan a group of Post it notes to a digital board where you can sort, organize, add notes, and share the board with others. Click the image below to watch a short video with specifics about how to use this useful app. Have you used this app? How might you use this app in your classroom?  Share your thoughts so we can learn from each other.  

The New Periodic Table of iPad Apps

The New Periodic Table Of IPad Apps via Mark Anderson @ICTEvangelist


Click on the image above or click here
 to see an informative graphic via Mark Anderson (@ICTEvangelist) that breaks down useful iPad apps into categories for suggested use.  You can easily search for apps by color coded categories like creativity, collaboration, teaching, learning and more.  This updated guide can serve as a great resource to determine apps that can amplify your existing teaching and make a big impact on learning in the classroom.  As Mark points out in his blog posts, it’s not all about the apps, good pedagogy always should come first.  To see the full blog post about this Periodic Table of iPad Apps click here.  There is also a Periodic Table of iPad STEAM apps and a Periodic Table of iPad apps for older students on the ICT Evangelist website.